WeedLife News Network

Hot off the press cannabis, marijuana, cbd and hemp news from around the world on the WeedLife News Network.

Legal pot is poised to spread further across the country this Election Day, with millions of voters casting ballots that could roll back marijuana prohibition in two states and expand access to medical cannabis in two others.

Mexico’s Supreme Court on Wednesday ruled that an absolute ban on recreational use of marijuana was unconstitutional, effectively leaving it to lawmakers to regulate consumption of the drug.

Entrepreneurs and investors who are flocking to the industry say legalization is inevitable in the U.S. But while more than 60 percent of Americans support making pot legal, the politics remain fraught.

Campaigns supporting and opposing marijuana ballot measures are filling up airwaves and social media feeds with political advertisements in the run-up to the midterm elections.

The lucrative legal cannabis industry is again front and center this voting year as Americans head to the polls for midterm elections November 6.

Four states will vote on ballot initiatives to decriminalize pot.

There are far more than five cannabis champions in the Senate, with multiple strong champions on both sides of the aisle.

Supporters of marijuana legalization will get four chances across the country in November to add to the expanding map of states where the drug is legal for recreational and medical use.

Sixty-six percent of Americans now support legalizing marijuana, another new high in Gallup's trend over nearly half a century.

Canada on Wednesday became the first major world economy to legalize recreational marijuana, beginning a national experiment that will alter the country’s social, cultural and economic fabric, and present the nation with its biggest public policy challenge in decades.

A key Democratic congressman has a step-by-step plan to enact the end of federal marijuana prohibition in 2019 if his party takes control of the House, and he's laying it all out in a new memo.

The momentum for cannabis reform in the U.S., which has had landmark political success beginning in 2012, appears to be gaining speed ahead of next month’s midterm elections.

Officers in Ottawa will be allowed to use marijuana off duty starting Oct. 17, but there are restrictions.

About six-in-ten Americans (62%) say the use of marijuana should be legalized, reflecting a steady increase over the past decade, according to a new Pew Research Center survey.

When voters head to the polls in November, they won't just be deciding on U.S. senators, members of Congress, governors and other elected officials. They'll also be voting on a number of far-reaching marijuana ballot initiatives.

A White House drug office official has offered assurances that a marijuana policy panel will be objective and dispassionate as it examines the impact of legalization in some states, a Colorado senator said.

It's the latest in a series of clashes between U.S. and state laws around the country that came out in favor of medical marijuana users trying to keep or obtain jobs with drug-testing employers.

With the midterm elections on the horizon, it’s a good time to spotlight those who have taken the most notable positions on marijuana policy, both positive and negative.

Though medical marijuana is legal in most states, the Department of Veterans Affairs will neither recommend nor prescribe it because of a longstanding federal law.

In a little over a month, Americans will head to the voting booths to vote in a very important midterm election that will have major impact on control of Congress and the Donald Trump presidency.