Medical marijuana is legal in Minnesota, but allowing recreational marijuana use for adults is an issue the candidates have been talking about on the campaign trail for Minnesota governor.

A dilemma for Minnesotans: Canada's legalizing recreational marijuana in October. And in November, North Dakota voters will decide whether to follow suit.

Minnesota Rep. Paul Thissen believes the recreational legalization is necessary to curb racial inequality in the state’s criminal justice system.

ST. PAUL — Minnesotans who suffer from post-traumatic stress disorder will be eligible to try medical cannabis starting Aug. 1.

Not to be confused with illicit marijuana, useful plant draws interest as crop option at U's ag campus.

MINNEAPOLIS (WCCO) — Since the passage of the medical marijuana bill in Minnesota, patients across the state have been helped.

ST. PAUL — Legalizing recreational marijuana would fall into the hands of voters if a proposal by State Rep. Jason Metsa, DFL-Virginia, makes its way through the Legislature.

Minnesotans suffering from post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) will be able to enroll in the state’s medical marijuana program starting Aug. 1, the state Health Department announced Thursday afternoon.

Visits to the state’s eight cannabis clinics doubled in August, the first month that pain patients were allowed into the program.

The state's tightly controlled program has seen high costs and low enrollment. Pain patients might turn the tide.

Expanding the list of qualifying conditions to include intractable pain marks a critical juncture in the year-old program, which is among the most restrictive in the country.

Image Jonathunder via Wikimedia Commons

ST. PAUL -- Severe pain soon will be a reason Minnesotans may use medical marijuana, something supporters say will reduce the need for powerful and often-dangerous prescription medicines.

ST. PAUL, Minn. (AP) — An advisory panel cautioned Wednesday against expanding Minnesota’s medical marijuana program to include patients suffering chronic pain starting next year.


 

The recommendation from the panel’s medical experts to Department of Health Commissioner Ed Ehlinger is not a final say — it’s up to Ehlinger to make the decision by Jan. 1. But five of eight panel members voted against the possible expansion, arguing that there’s limited evidence of marijuana’s efficacy in treating pain and noting physicians’ reluctance to using the drug as a treatment.

Click here to read the complete article

The Associated Press


WeedLife.com