Imagine a pain reliever 30 times stronger at reducing inflammation than Aspirin. Researchers at the University of Guelph in Canada are the first to uncover the pain-relief potential of cannabis, demonstrating just how strong the plant could be.

Terpenes, terpenoids, terps. Whatever you call them, these compounds in cannabis that give it distinctive aromas and flavors are popping up in consumer products everywhere.

Being wind pollinated, hemp plants produce large amounts of pollen that are attractive to bees.

The discovery of cannabis pollen near a Viking settlement in Newfoundland raises the question of whether the Vikings were smoking or eating pot while exploring North America.

The U.S. government is growing the largest crop of research marijuana in five years, responding to interest in varieties with high levels of THC and CBD.

Cannabis may have originated high on the Tibetan Plateau, according to an analysis of fossil pollen.

“Although we have much still to learn, it appears that in some situations, the ECS acts as a volume control for a variety of processes and factors, modulating the way our body interprets signals, whether they be pain, hunger, excitement, etc.”

A new wave of research points toward cannabinoids having an adaptive, immunomodulating effect, rather than just suppressing immune activity.

In what is believed to be the largest private gift yet to support scientific research on cannabis, a donor is giving $9 million to support Harvard and MIT work on cannabis and its effects on the brain.

Verda Bio won the state's first pot research license last November, giving the company special privileges to study cannabis and create new technology.

Researchers are currently seeking volunteers willing to smoke up and get behind the wheel of a sophisticated driving simulator. The only catch: You’ve got to bring your own cannabis.

Though research is truly in its beginning stages, the cannabinoids known as THCV, CBN, and CBG are emerging as medically -- and in some cases recreationally -- significant.

Cooking with cannabis has evolved beyond the edibles of our youth, which were often viewed as a delivery vehicle for an intense high rather than a legitimate culinary pursuit.

As a green gold rush in legal marijuana and its non-drug cousin hemp spreads across North America, a growing number of colleges are adding cannabis to the curriculum to prepare graduates for careers cultivating, researching, analyzing and marketing the herb.

A group of researchers from the University of New Mexico have found that scientists may have been mistaken about the chemicals that are most and least associated with marijuana's medicinal properties.

Farmers (and Sen. Mitch McConnell) aren’t the only ones who are excited about hemp. According to a recent study, the crop also attracts a variety of bees—and that can help inform ecologically sustainable agriculture practices.

Companies are working to develop consumer-friendly cannabis drinks that can compete with alcohol but there’s one problem: Pot is nothing like booze.

If you’ve ever wondered what causes the notable “high” from marijuana, you have the endocannabinoid system to thank.

If you’ve ever wondered how cannabis gets its aroma, then you’re really asking what are terpenes.

Dr. Mark Ware has devoted the past 20 years of his career to studying marijuana, and he can remember some “dark, lean” periods when he had to fight for meagre funding.


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