A poll published this week showed that only a fraction of residents in Massachusetts believe legalization of marijuana has negatively impacted the state.

The University of Massachusetts Amherst and WCVB published a poll on Monday in which 61% of respondents said legal adult-use cannabis has overall been positive for the state. While 25% said it was neither positive nor negative, only 13% said it was negative.
 
“This poll also shows that legalization is reducing the stigma historically associated with cannabis, which will only enable the Commission to continue making headway on efforts to ensure full participation in this industry by disproportionately harmed communities,” Cannabis Control Commission Chairman Steven J. Hoffman said in a statement.
 
“Our work is far from done, and my colleagues and I will continue to be vocal about the solutions that are needed to ensure Massachusetts meets its equity mandate.”
 
The poll was conducted from Nov. 9 through Nov. 16 and consisted of 750 respondents.
 
On Nov. 8, 2016, Massachusetts voters approved the legalization, regulation and taxation of cannabis with 1,769,328 voters, or 52%, in favor of Question 4, and 1,528,219 voters, or 45%, in opposition. Legalization came following the 2012 approval of cannabis for medical use and the decriminalization of small amounts of the plant in 2008.
 
Nov. 20 represented the three-year anniversary of the first adult-use marijuana retailers opening in Massachusetts — the first on the East Coast.
 
Since then, 179 stores have started operations. A total of 325 adult-use marijuana establishments, including indoor and outdoor cultivators, product manufacturers, microbusinesses, delivery businesses, and independent testing labs, have opened, according to the Cannabis Control Commission.
 
The adult-use industry has generated more than $2.3 billion of gross sales revenue in that time, the CCC said.
 
 
 
Rate this article: 
Select ratingGive New poll shows majority of residents in Massachusetts believe legalization of cannabis is overall positive for state 1/5Give New poll shows majority of residents in Massachusetts believe legalization of cannabis is overall positive for state 2/5Give New poll shows majority of residents in Massachusetts believe legalization of cannabis is overall positive for state 3/5Give New poll shows majority of residents in Massachusetts believe legalization of cannabis is overall positive for state 4/5Give New poll shows majority of residents in Massachusetts believe legalization of cannabis is overall positive for state 5/5
Authored By: 
Article category: 
Regional Marijuana News: 
e-mail icon

To understand how rapidly New York overhauled its marijuana laws, look no further than its impact on the criminal justice system.

Fewer and fewer people are being arrested on marijuana offenses in New York, underscoring the major effect of the drug’s decriminalization in 2019 and, ultimately, its legalization this past March.

From April through October of this year, just 116 people statewide were arrested on a top-level misdemeanor or felony charge related to marijuana possession or sale in New York, data compiled by the state Division of Criminal Justice Services shows.

And as of early October, 11 people remained incarcerated in state prisons with a top crime of either criminal sale or possession of marijuana in the first, second or third degree, according to the state Department of Correction and Community Supervision. A top charge is the most severe offense someone is arrested for.

The drop-off in marijuana arrests has been stark as state lawmakers and then-Gov. Andrew Cuomo reshaped the state’s laws related to the drug.

In 2020, after New York lawmakers took steps to decrease marijuana penalties but before they legalized certain amounts of the substance, there were 2,720 misdemeanor or felony marijuana arrests. Compare that to 2017, when there were 28,239 misdemeanor marijuana arrests alone, according to a study by the John Jay College of Criminal Justice.

e-mail icon

Pharmacy chains will be appealing the verdict that they created a public nuisance by contributing the Ohio’s opioid crisis.

A federal jury in Ohio on Tuesday found that pharmacy giants Walgreens, CVS and Walmart contributed to the opioid crisis in that state, a verdict that could serve as a bellwether for thousands of similar cases pending from coast to coast. The decision is the first verdict returned by a jury that holds a pharmacy retailer responsible for its role in the devastating epidemic of opioid overdoses that has plagued the United States for decades.

In the lawsuit, Lake and Trumbell Counties in northeastern Ohio maintained that the pharmacy retailers had recklessly distributed more than 100 million opioid pain pills in the counties, leading to addiction, death and a strain on public services. Between 2012 and 2016, more than 80 million prescriptions painkillers were dispensed in Trumbull County alone, or about 400 pills for every resident. During the same period, approximately 61 million opioid painkillers were dispensed in Lake County.

“For decades, pharmacy chains have watched as the pills flowing out of their doors cause harm and failed to take action as required by law,” a committee of attorneys representing local governments in federal opioid lawsuits said in a statement. “Instead, these companies responded by opening up more locations, flooding communities with pills, and facilitating the flow of opioids into an illegal, secondary market.”

Counties Say Pharmacies Created a Public Nuisance

Attorneys for the plaintiffs argued that the actions of the pharmacies amounted to a public nuisance that cost the counties about $1 billion each to address. Mark Lanier, an attorney representing the counties, said that the pharmacies failed to hire or train enough employees and implement systems to prevent suspicious orders from being filled.

“The law requires pharmacies to be diligent in dealing drugs,” Lanier said. “This case should be a wake-up call that failure will not be accepted.” 

e-mail icon

Authorities said they found more than 11,000 marijuana plants at an illegal growing operation Wednesday after one of the buildings caught fire.

The blaze was reported at about 4:30 a.m. on San Timoteo Canyon Road in Redlands, east of Los Angeles. Firefighters needed about an hour to douse the flames and they discovered the marijuana operation, police said.

The blaze apparently started in a living section of an outbuilding that was gutted and a second outbuilding was damaged, police said.

Marijuana plants were found in the second building and thousands more were in a third building that wasn't damaged, police said.

Police photos showed rows of plants in containers inside a building that appeared to have a sophisticated growing system.

Investigators seized the plants and 83 pounds of harvested product, all of which will be destroyed, police said.

A dog found at the site had minor burns and was turned over to animal control officers, police said.
Rate this article: 
Select ratingGive Southern California fire leads to discovery of thousands of illegal marijuana plants 1/5Give Southern California fire leads to discovery of thousands of illegal marijuana plants 2/5Give Southern California fire leads to discovery of thousands of illegal marijuana plants 3/5Give Southern California fire leads to discovery of thousands of illegal marijuana plants 4/5Give Southern California fire leads to discovery of thousands of illegal marijuana plants 5/5
Authored By: 
Article category: 
Regional Marijuana News: 
e-mail icon

Week 12 of Operation Hammer Strike resulted in 22 search warrants, 204 greenhouses eradicated, and 26 arrests, officials said. Between November 15, 2021, and November 21, 2021, investigators from the San Bernardino County Sheriff’s Department – Marijuana Enforcement Team (MET), along with San Bernardino Sheriff’s deputies from several different patrol stations, served 22 search warrants at various locations in Lucerne Valley, Wonder Valley, Joshua Tree, Oro Grande, Helendale, Newberry Springs, Barstow, Huntington Beach, Westminster, Anaheim, Muscoy, Adelanto, and Phelan.

MET personnel had received numerous complaints about large outdoor and indoor marijuana cultivations in these areas. Over this past week, the San Bernardino County Sheriff’s personnel located and arrested 26 suspects.

Investigators seized 29,794 marijuana plants, 1,842 pounds of processed marijuana, four guns, and over $57,000.00 in cash. Investigators eradicated a total of 204 greenhouses found at these locations.

The investigations revealed the cannabis cultivations were not in compliance with California’s Medical and Adult-Use Cannabis Regulation and Safety Act (MAUCRSA) and San Bernardino County’s ordinance prohibiting Commercial Cannabis Activity. San Bernardino County has a law prohibiting Commercial Cannabis Activity, which includes growing marijuana plants outdoors.  

The Sheriff’s Gangs/Narcotics Division will continue to enforce California’s cannabis laws and San Bernardino County’s ordinance regarding cannabis cultivation and distribution. Persons found guilty of violating the state law and county ordinance are subject to fines, prosecution, and seizure of property.  

Property owners who are growing marijuana or are aware their tenants are growing marijuana on their properties in violation of the state law and local ordinances may also be subject to civil or criminal sanctions. Property owners are encouraged to contact their local law enforcement or code compliance agency to confirm if cultivating cannabis is prohibited or allowed under specific regulations.

e-mail icon

The East Hampton Town Board, as expected, voted unanimously last Thursday to opt out of allowing cannabis retail dispensaries or on-site consumption licenses. 

New York State legalized adult use of cannabis with the Marijuana Regulation and Taxation Act in March, creating an Office of Cannabis Management to oversee and implement the law. If a municipality does not opt out by Dec. 31, it cannot do so later. However, it can opt out by that deadline and then opt back in to allow retail dispensaries, on-site consumption licenses, or both.

In opting out, the board postponed a decision in order to further study the implications before potentially opting in, its multiple discussions to date having done little to further the development of a policy. There has been scant public comment on the issue.

The board also voted to adopt the town’s 2022 budget, following a public hearing earlier this month. The $85.49 million budget reflects a regrading of 115 town employees, with wage increases averaging 5 percent. It also includes funding for additional police officers and an ordinance inspector, as well as for the promotion of ordinance enforcement officers.

And the board voted to adopt a more stringent building code, an effort to reduce greenhouse gas emissions by requiring new construction and major renovations to achieve maximum efficiency through technology and design.

e-mail icon

The Brighton Board of Education Monday night unanimously approved a resolution asking that the local governing bodies prohibit a marijuana dispensing facility within their jurisdictions. That includes the city of Brighton and the surrounding municipalities of Genoa Twp., Green Oak Twp., Hamburg Twp. and Brighton Twp. The vote to formally adopt the measure was 6-0, with Board Vice President Alicia Reid absent.

The resolution asks that the elected officials of the local governments involved, all of which are partially or entirely within the Brighton Area Schools' boundaries, to “help protect our students from the negative consequences of marijuana by prohibiting marijuana businesses in their jurisdictions.” Citing a court case, the resolution states that allowing marijuana dispensaries in a community, “results in increased youth access and sends youth a message that marijuana is a safe drug.”

The resolution also cites data indicating marijuana potency “has increased significantly over (the) past decades,” that its use “negatively affects the developing teen brain, diminishing the ability to learn…and is strongly associated with academic underperformance.” The resolution states further that marijuana use is addictive, leads to “markedly increased drug violations at school (and can) worsen depression, while leading to “serious mental health issues.”

The Brighton City Council held a retreat on Oct. 2nd to discuss the ramifications of allowing a marijuana dispensary, and virtually all who spoke objected to permitting such a business to locate in Brighton, particularly in the downtown area. The thorny issue first came up several months ago when Jerry Millen of Hartland Twp. purchased the former Rolison PRO Hardware at 111 West Main St. and said he would like to convert it into a marijuana dispensary.

While he has not yet approached the city with a formal proposal, Millen did provide a statement to WHMI about the resolution. In it, he said that with "all due respect to the Brighton school board" he had to disagree with some of the information they are disseminating. "The cases they put forward regarding the use of medical marijuana have an unfair bias against its uses," stated Millen. "Being a parent 1st and foremost, my top priority is to help keep cannabis out of reach of children, and educate them on its potential harms to their developing brains." He then offered to personally give a tour of his store in downtown Walled Lake to anyone "who would like to be educated on cannabis and its benefits, and to see for themselves exactly what it is we do."

e-mail icon

Small-holder farmers meant to benefit from South Africa’s new cannabis dispensation to unlock a potentially huge economic sector may be left out in the cold because of stringent regulatory requirements. 

At the end of October, the Agriculture Land Reform and Rural Development Department announced the opening of applications for hemp cultivation permits, a move welcomed by 

organisations that have been waiting to kick-start this new economic sector. This followed the declaration of hemp as an agricultural crop under the Plant Improvement Act, which allows its importation, exportation, cultivation, sale and research.

Both hemp and marijuana are from the cannabis plant, but marijuana is associated with tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), which causes the “high”, and hemp with cannabidiol (CBD), which is associated with health benefits. 

People in many rural parts of South Africa have been cultivating cannabis for hundreds of years, but studies show that this was predominantly for recreational consumption by an adult marijuana market.

e-mail icon

Massachusetts had already legalized medical marijuana when voters were faced with another question in late 2016: whether to legalize cannabis for recreational use. The vote wasn’t close, sailing through on talk of jobs, tax revenue, and, well, people wanting to light up legally. Reality doesn’t always live up to promise, but in this case, it has. Yes, the industry is still facing growing pains, particularly when it comes to creating a level playing field for entrepreneurs. But when it comes to this new industry’s impact on jobs, real-estate investment, municipal tax revenue, and more, these are truly high times.

David Narkewicz wasn’t just a supporter of cannabis coming to Northampton. He was the first customer.

That was three years ago, when NETA opened on Conz Street and became the state’s very first dispensary for legal, recreational cannabis. Today, with cannabis businesses proliferating in the city and across Massachusetts, the outgoing mayor believes his initial enthusiasm was justified.

“We saw the experience of other states, and a lot of the Massachusetts law, when they were trying to put together the regulatory framework, was based on looking at laws in other states,” Narkewicz said. “First and foremost, I supported legalization just as a public-policy meaure, but I also saw an opportunity for investment in the community.”

Elaborating, he said the city is known as a destination with a vibrant retail sector, arts and culture establishments, and plenty of restaurants and bars. “So my sense, and my hope, was that this would be a new investment in the community and a new source of jobs and revenue, and another reason to come to Northampton. I think we took a pretty forward-looking approach to this.”

e-mail icon

U.S. vessel offloads about $640 million worth of illegal drugs at Port Everglades in Florida.

The crew of U.S. Coast Guard Cutter Hamilton recently offloaded more than 13 tons of cocaine and almost two tons of cannabis in Florida, with the hefty haul estimated to be worth US$504 million ($640 million).

Called the largest drug interdiction in the ship’s history, the approximately 26,250 pounds (11,907 kilograms) of cocaine and about 3,700 pounds (1,678.3 kg) of cannabis were intercepted and seized in international waters of the Eastern Pacific Ocean off the coasts of Mexico, Central America and South America.

The total included contraband seized and recovered during eight interdictions of suspected drug smuggling vessels by three other U.S. and Canadian ships, notes a statement from the U.S. Coast Guard.
“I could not be prouder of this crew and their determination to keeping more than 26,000 pounds of cocaine from reaching the shores of Central and North America,” Capt. Matthew Brown, the ship’s commanding officer, said in the statement.

“It has been a dynamic two and half months for this ship with some very difficult law enforcement cases,” Brown continues, adding that the efforts have resulted in the apprehension of 14 suspected drug traffickers.

While quite impressive, Coast Guard Cutter Hamilton, a 127-metre national security cutter homeported in Charleston, S.C., did not best another recently set record, this time by Coast Guard Cutter James.

In August, that ship’s crew came to shore with about 59,700 pounds (27,079 kilograms) of cocaine and 1,430 pounds (649 kg) of cannabis. The value of that massive load was estimated at more than US$1.4 billion ($1.8 billion).

In late 2020, the same ship offloaded more than US$411.3 million ($526.5 million) worth of cocaine and cannabis in Florida.

Rate this article: 
Select ratingGive Cocaine and cannabis seizure is the largest ever for Coast Guard Cutter Hamilton 1/5Give Cocaine and cannabis seizure is the largest ever for Coast Guard Cutter Hamilton 2/5Give Cocaine and cannabis seizure is the largest ever for Coast Guard Cutter Hamilton 3/5Give Cocaine and cannabis seizure is the largest ever for Coast Guard Cutter Hamilton 4/5Give Cocaine and cannabis seizure is the largest ever for Coast Guard Cutter Hamilton 5/5
Authored By: 
Article category: 
Regional Marijuana News: 
e-mail icon

Now in Illinois the smell of marijuana does not give probable cause for officers to do a warrantless search during traffic stops.

On Friday Whiteside County court Judge Daniel P. Dalton made the ruling.

Local law enforcement officials say this could cause issues when officers try to stop people who have recently smoked the drug.

“In Illinois, you can transport legally cannabis as long as it's on odorless container well that right there on its face means that you shouldn’t be able to smell it,” said Sangamon County Sheriff Jack Campbell.

He said this will only create more problems for law enforcement trying to stop those driving while impaired.

e-mail icon

To understand how rapidly New York overhauled its marijuana laws, look no further than its impact on the criminal justice system.

Fewer and fewer people are being arrested on marijuana offenses in New York, underscoring the major effect of the drug’s decriminalization in 2019 and, ultimately, its legalization this past March. 

From April through October of this year, just 116 people statewide were arrested on a top-level misdemeanor or felony charge related to marijuana possession or sale in New York, data compiled by the state Division of Criminal Justice Services shows.

And as of early October, 11 people remained incarcerated in state prisons with a top crime of either criminal sale or possession of marijuana in the first-, second- or third-degree, according to the state Department of Correction and Community Supervision. 

A top charge is the most severe offense someone is arrested for.

e-mail icon

U.K. officers standing in street below have no problem spotting earthbound cannabis before collecting it.

Make it rain took on a whole new meaning when a U.K. man reportedly tossed a large amount of illegal cannabis from the window of his flat while patient police officers and bemused onlookers watched the clumsy evasion attempt from below.

According to Birmingham Mail, officers were closing in on the suspected dealer’s home when he apparently decided it was time to get rid of the evidence on Monday morning. Unfortunately, he was not discreet, and plenty of people witnessed the botched attempt.

Indeed, part of the big show was caught on video, which Birmz is Grime released on Twitter for all to see. About partway through the process, the 45-second video shows two officers on the street with a whole lot of dried flower at their feet. There is also a heaping pile of cannabis gathered on the ledge below the open window.

Fittingly, the window is located above a store called Swag Emporium, with a tag line that possibly starts with “High Fashion,” though the grainy video does not display the full sign.Later in the video, four officers are seen on the street as two cops scramble to collect the fallen bud.

The person apparently taking the video says of the apartment dweller: “He threw a box straight out of the window,” as the video shows two officers, gloved and one with a broom, putting the weed into a clear bag.

Taking, carrying, making, selling, dealing or sharing drugs, including cannabis, is illegal throughout the U.K., the government reports. For a Class B drug like cannabis, possessing it can result in as long as five years in prison while supplying or producing it can spur a maximum 14-year sentence. Unlimited fines, or both prison time and these penalties, are also options for U.K. courts.

e-mail icon

Stores hit by groups of thieves in Walnut Creek, SF, San Jose, Hayward; ‘roving caravans’ target pot dispensaries, pharmacies in Oakland

Bay Area law enforcement authorities and retail officials expressed shock and concern Monday after a string of brash public robberies over the weekend saw groups of people — as many as 80 in one case — swarm stores, grab merchandise and flee while the holiday shopping season is in full swing.

In Oakland, roving caravans of armed robbers hit marijuana dispensaries and other retail shops and pharmacies across the city, often forcing their way in by gunfire, according to police Chief LeRonne Armstrong.

Thieves also struck the Nordstrom store in Walnut Creek, a jewelry store at a Hayward mall, retailers in San Francisco’s Union Square, and a high end clothing store and a sunglasses shop in San Jose. Authorities were looking for any possible links between the cases.

A San Jose police spokesman said the targeting Sunday of a Lululemon shop at Santana Row was “organized robbery.”

e-mail icon

An executive board has adopted a report from a committee dispatched by the Legislature to study draft legislation on medical and adult-use cannabis.

A South Dakota legislative board has adopted a report from a committee dispatched by the Legislature to study draft legislation on medical and adult-use cannabis in the state.

The committee drafted nearly two dozen bills that would change South Dakota’s medical cannabis program, according to The Globe, as well as an adult-use legalization bill that committee chairman Bryan Breitling told the news outlet would be a “fail-safe” if the state’s Supreme Court upholds a lower court injunction against South Dakota’s voter-approved Amendment A.

The Legislature’s 15-member executive board voted to accept the committee’s report, although the vote does not represent endorsement of any of the draft bills, The Globe reported. The legislation will likely surface during the state’s upcoming legislative session, according to the news outlet.

South Dakota’s cannabis study committee broke into two separate panels, one on adult-use and one on medical cannabis, and received testimony from legal and health experts, cannabis advocates, and local leaders, The Globe reported.

South Dakota kicks off its 2022 legislative session Jan. 11.

Rate this article: 
Select ratingGive South Dakota Legislative Board Adopts Cannabis Study Committee’s Report 1/5Give South Dakota Legislative Board Adopts Cannabis Study Committee’s Report 2/5Give South Dakota Legislative Board Adopts Cannabis Study Committee’s Report 3/5Give South Dakota Legislative Board Adopts Cannabis Study Committee’s Report 4/5Give South Dakota Legislative Board Adopts Cannabis Study Committee’s Report 5/5
Article category: 
Regional Marijuana News: 
e-mail icon

If the group gathers 133,000 signatures, the Ohio Legislature would have four months to consider the group’s initiated statute.

The Coalition to Regulate Marijuana Like Alcohol has collected nearly enough signatures to advance its adult-use cannabis legalization proposal in Ohio, according to the Ohio Capital Journal.

Thomas Haren, an Ohio-based attorney and a spokesperson for the Coalition to Regulate Marijuana Like Alcohol, told the news outlet that he expects the group to gather the 133,000 required signatures by the end of the month.

If the group succeeds, the Ohio Legislature would have four months to consider the coalition’s initiated statute, which would legalize the personal use, sale and possession of cannabis in the state.

The proposal would allow adults 21 and older to possess up to 2.5 ounces of cannabis or 15 grams of cannabis extract. Adults would also be permitted to purchase cannabis at dispensaries or grow up to two plants at home for personal use.

If lawmakers fail to pass the statute, the Coalition to Regulate Marijuana Like Alcohol can collect an additional 130,000 signatures to place its proposed law before voters on Ohio’s November 2022 ballot.

In the meantime, State Reps. Casey Weinstein and Terrance Upchurch introduced an adult-use cannabis legalization bill in the House over the summer, while Rep. Jamie Callendar introduced his own adult-use legislation last month.

e-mail icon

Fresh off of news that California is set to raise the cannabis cultivation tax despite projections of a $31 billion surplus, one marijuana entrepreneur is calling for a potential tax revolt this summer. Michael “Mikey” Steinmetz, co-founder of the company that makes the Flow Kana cannabis brand, is threatening to withhold his taxes unless Gov. Gavin Newsom and the Legislature adjust state marijuana regulations July 1, 2022. He is calling on other CEOs to join him in this effort. Steinmetz issued the declaration in an op-ed on Medium, published Monday.

He criticized the California Department of Tax and Fee Administration’s plans to increase the cultivation tax this January, writing “We simply reply: We’re not going to pay.”

Retail marijuana is taxed three times in California: an excise tax paid by buyers, sales tax paid by customers and the cultivation tax that growers pay. Growers wants changes to the cultivation tax because they pay it before they make a sale. California’s current cannabis cultivation tax is $9.65 per dry weight ounce for cannabis flower, $2.87 per dry weight ounce for leaves and $1.35 per dry weight ounce for cannabis plants. That will increase to $10.08 for flower, $3 for leaves and $1.41 for plants beginning Jan. 1. The increased rates “reflect as an adjustment for inflation as required by the Cannabis Tax Law,” according to the department.

The proposed increase has drawn condemnation from cannabis advocates, including California NORML, whose director Dale Gieringer said in a statement, “The legal industry is already so burdened by excessive taxes and regulation that it cannot compete with unlicensed marketers. California needs to be reducing, not increasing cannabis taxes to make the legal market more competitive.”

WHAT FLOW KANA WANTS

e-mail icon
With recreational pot becoming legal in New York, health officials are expressing concern that there will be more people on the roads driving high.
Experts say each person's body reacts differently to the chemicals in marijuana.
Police tell News 12 that pot should be treated like alcohol, with sobriety tests being used to check drivers.
 
As for crashes, some studies show no increase after marijuana was legalized - while others found the opposite.
 
A top AAA official says education is key. "There needs to be a rigorous public education campaign not only for youngsters but also for the general public...there is a need for more DREs (drug recognition experts).  All the revenue that comes from marijuana sales, we want more police to be trained as drug recognition experts," says Robert Sinclair Jr., of AAA Northeast.
Breathalyzer-like devices that measure THC, the psycho-active ingredient in marijuana, are in various stages of development.
Rate this article: 
Select ratingGive Concern about people driving high increases as recreational marijuana legalized 1/5Give Concern about people driving high increases as recreational marijuana legalized 2/5Give Concern about people driving high increases as recreational marijuana legalized 3/5Give Concern about people driving high increases as recreational marijuana legalized 4/5Give Concern about people driving high increases as recreational marijuana legalized 5/5
Authored By: 
Article category: 
Regional Marijuana News: 
e-mail icon

The Village of Greenport could vote to prohibit the sale of retail marijuana following a public hearing next week.

New York passed legislation earlier this year legalizing recreational marijuana use for adults 21 and over. Municipalities have until Dec. 31 to opt out of allowing on-site consumption and/or retail dispensaries from locating and operating within their boundaries. Although an opt-out can be repealed later, localities may not opt out of the legislation after that date.

Village trustees briefly discussed the vote at a work session on Thursday night, including the possibility of a permissive referendum if the board votes to opt-out. 

According to the New York Conference of Mayors, residents seeking a permissive referendum must file a valid petition signed by at least 20% of registered voters in the village with the office of the village clerk within 30 days of the law’s passage. If no petition is filed, then the local law or resolution goes into effect. 

“Because we have permissive referendum included, we would need to vote at this month’s meeting,” said village clerk Sylvia Pirillo. The village has prepared resolutions to opt-out.

e-mail icon

A direct-democracy attempt to force the state legislature to act on recreational marijuana will have enough signatures by the month’s end to set a plan in motion, an organizer projected Friday.

Ohio attorney Thomas Haren, a representative of the “Coalition to Regulate Marijuana Like Alcohol,” said he expects that enough signatures will be gathered to move a proposal forward that would allow for adult use, sale, and possession of marijuana in Ohio.

“We think that marijuana reform is popular,” he said at a panel hosted by the Ohio State University law school’s Drug Enforcement and Policy Center.

“It’s not a bipartisan issue. It’s a nonpartisan issue.”

The coalition launched what’s known in Ohio as an initiated statute. It proposed the architecture of a recreational marijuana program in Ohio. If state officials determine the coalition gathered the required 133,000 valid signatures, lawmakers in the Ohio General Assembly get four months to act on the proposal. If lawmakers fail, organizers must gather more signatures to send the proposal to a popular vote by the people at the next general election.

e-mail icon

WeedLife.com