Image via AdWeek.com

There's a long and not-very-proud tradition of anti-drug advertising that gets ridiculed for missing the mark with young audiences.

Australia's New South Wales government just added a classic new entry to that hall of shame with #StonerSloth, a campaign designed to shame teens who get high—but who are finding the ads hilariously delightful instead.

In three short videos, marijuana has turned teens into giant sloths—and the metaphor is made literal, as the kids are actually depicted as giant hairy beasts with long, curved claws.

Socially, they're utterly useless.

All they can do is moan, since they're so high. And they can't take tests at school, make small talk at parties, or—most comically, if unintentionally so—even pass the salt at dinner.

"You're worse on weed," claims the tagline.

Click here to read the complete article

Tim Nudd ~ AdWeek.com ~

Recent News Articles

Friday August 23

Napa County Ballot to Include Initiative for Commercial Cannabis Cultivation

in U.S. News

by Mike Fuller

Will wine tasters be set off their cabernet sauvignon should Napa County decide to allow…

180 hits

Saturday August 24

California Says Its Cannabis Revenue Has Fallen Short Of Estimates, Despite Gains

in U.S. News

by Mike Fuller

California's cannabis excise tax generated only $74.2 million in the second quarter of 2019, the…

149 hits

Saturday August 24

CBD Companies Positioning Themselves For Cannabis Legalization

in Cannabis News

by Mike Fuller

Recreational cannabis use is illegal in the majority of US states, but the relaxation of…

586 hits

Monday August 26

DEA Announces It Will Finally Take Action On Marijuana Grower Applications - Cannabis News

in Politics

by Bruce Kennedy - Editor in Chief

The Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) announced on Monday that is is taking steps to expand…

123 hits

Monday August 26

How much pot in that brownie? Chocolate can throw off tests - Cannabis News

in Science

by Bruce Kennedy - Editor in Chief

Chocolate can throw off potency tests so labels aren’t always accurate, and now scientists are…

142 hits